Ex-NBA player Sebastian Telfair gets prison time in gun case

NEW YORK — Former NBA player Sebastian Telfair has been sentenced to 3½ years in prison in a New York City gun case.

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez said on Monday that Telfair received the term for his conviction in April on a gun-possession charge.

Police had arrested the 33-year-old Telfair in 2017 after finding a loaded pistol in his pickup truck during a traffic stop.

The Brooklyn-born Telfair was a first-round draft pick out of high school in 2004. He started with the Portland Trail Blazers and spent time with the Boston Celtics, Minnesota Timberwolves and other teams before ending his career in China in 2014.

There was no immediate response to a phone message on Monday seeking comment from Telfair’s attorney.

NCAA amends agent rules to no longer require college degree

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA has backtracked on new certification standards and will no longer require a bachelor’s degree for a sports agent to represent Division I men’s basketball players who declare for the NBA draft while maintaining college eligibility.

The requirement drew criticism last week when the certification standards were revealed, including a social media blast by NBA star LeBron James. The requirement was quickly dubbed the “Rich Paul Rule” in reference to James’ agent, who does not have a college degree.

The NCAA announced Monday it would amend the standards so bachelor’s degrees would not be required for agents currently certified and in good standing with the NBA players union. The NCAA had said last week it modeled its rules after those of the National Basketball Players Association.

“We have been made aware of several current agents who have appropriately represented former student-athletes in their professional quest and whom the (NBPA) has granted waivers of its bachelor’s degree requirement,” the NCAA said in a statement. “While specific individuals were not considered when developing our process, we respect the NBPA’s determination of qualification and have amended our certification criteria.”

The NCAA rule permitting players to obtain an agent yet still return to school after withdrawing from the draft was part of recommendations from the Condoleezza Rice-led Commission on College Basketball, which was formed in response to a federal corruption investigation into the sport.

The change took place last August, and the first players to take advantage of the rule did so in the spring. They were permitted to sign with an agent certified by the NBPA — which was the stopgap standard until the NCAA put together its own certification requirements — though they had to terminate the deal if they decided to withdraw from the draft and return to school.

The amended policy still requires the agent to be certified by the NBPA for at least three consecutive years, as well as taking an in-person examination, going through a background check and paying required fees. In its release last week, the NCAA said agents would pay a $250 application fee and an annual $1,250 certification fee separate from NBPA certification requirements.

ESPN’s Rodriguez: Personal items stolen from rental SUV

SAN FRANCISCO — A rental vehicle being used by ESPN baseball analyst Alex Rodriguez was broken into Sunday night, and Rodriguez said several items of a personal and sentimental nature were stolen.

The break-in happened while Rodriguez and other members of ESPN’s “Sunday Night Baseball” crew were having dinner at a restaurant near Oracle Park after a game Rodriguez called between the Philadelphia Phillies and San Francisco Giants.

Rodriguez said in a statement Monday he was encouraged that police had security-camera video of the crime.

ESPN said it was working with local authorities. The items were stolen from an SUV that ESPN had rented for Rodriguez and the production crew.

San Francisco police spokesman Adam Lobsinger said in an email that a bag, laptop, camera and pieces of jewelry were stolen. He also said the department’s burglary unit is handling the investigation.

The city has dealt with a rash of car burglaries. According to police, there were 11,269 reports of break-ins — an average of 62 per day — in San Francisco during the first half of the year.

Rodriguez is in his second year with ESPN. He was not the only member of the network’s crew to be involved in an incident over the weekend. Analyst Jessica Mendoza missed Sunday’s game after being involved in a car crash on Friday near her home in Oregon. ESPN said Mendoza was not seriously injured and was recovering with her family and was expected back in the booth soon.

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