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WASHINGTON — Although Amanda Villegas’s manual dexterity is hindered by her mild case of cerebral palsy, she is a gifted photographer who documented the last five days of her husband’s life with bladder cancer that metastasized. She has posted the photos on Google Drive, under “This is Cance…

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We’ve heard in the news, recently, that there’s been a crime spree in cities outside of the Antelope Valley. There have been smash-and-grabs, murders, assaults, car chases and myriad other incidents.

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WASHINGTON — One year ago, Joe Biden promised in his inaugural address to put his “whole soul” into “bringing America together.” Now the president who just compared Republicans to racists, segregationists and traitors is blaming the GOP for his utter failure to deliver on that promise.

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There are some notions so thunderously discredited by experience that they may never be revived. No serious person still believes that lead can be turned into gold, that astrologers can predict the future or that fans will turn out to watch baseball in Miami.

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Even before a proposed homeowner-inspired measure aiming to restore full zoning powers to local governments hit the streets looking to qualify for next fall’s ballot, the battle over who would control housing decisions in California began heating up.

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WASHINGTON — When Gen. David H. Berger, commandant of the Marine Corps, announced a radical new plan in 2019 to remake his service, many Marines figuratively rolled their eyes. For a combat force proud of its traditions, change can sometimes seem like the enemy.

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Once, during a meeting with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump inside Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue in New York, we discussed energy policy. I told Trump that if we went all out to produce America’s abundant supply of oil, gas and coal, the United States could be energy independent in fo…

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One year after California created America’s first official task force on reparations for Black slavery, every question remains open: Will there be reparations and if so, what shape should they take and who should pay them?

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A Palmdale woman convicted of killing her 23-month-old son in 2014 has filed a petition, claiming that she’s eligible for re-sentencing under a recent change in state law that affects some murder cases.

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"We’re tired of paying more for everything” seems to be the consensus these days. From groceries to rent, to gasoline, everything seems to have increased in price — utilities are no exception.

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Long before the arrival of COVID-19, America was being ravaged by a deadly epidemic. Unlike the Coronavirus, though, the drug overdose plague didn’t elicit a massive response from public officials.

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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot deserves credit for standing up to the Chicago Teachers Union. But the fact that so many Chicago teachers were willing to abandon their students in the first place is disgraceful.

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After Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial ended in acquittal, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) suggested that the former president could still be held civilly or criminally liable for his role in the Capitol riot that happened a year ago, last Thursday. 

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What’s more important than responding to a call for back-up from a fellow police officer, while out on patrol? Apparently for two Los Angeles Police Department officers, it was chasing Pokémon Go characters.

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‘The most dangerous pronoun discourse has nothing to do with gender identity. It’s the undefined ‘we’ in public policy debates that’s the problem.” These are the words of Richard Morrison, a research fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Morrison identified “the fallacy of we,” and…

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If California’s often misguided utility regulators wanted to prove they are determined to favor privately owned electric companies over almost any other interest, they could not do better than with new rules they now propose to inflict on people with rooftop solar panels.

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WASHINGTON — Monday night’s national championship game is the maraschino cherry atop the sundae of post-season college football. The nation’s highest-paid government employee — coach Nick Saban, $9.75 million — led the University of Alabama’s student-athletes against their counterparts from …

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A modest 199,000 jobs were added in December and the nation’s unemployment rate fell to a healthy 3.9%. However, the low number of new jobs is evidence that employers are struggling to fill positions and many Americans are still reluctant to return to the workforce.