Election 2018 Florida

A crowd protests outside the Broward County Supervisor of Elections office Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, in Lauderhill, Fla. A possible recount looms in a tight Florida governor, Senate and agriculture commission race. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Florida is once again at the center of election controversy, but this year there are no hanging chads or butterfly ballots, like in 2000. And no angry mobs in suits — at least not yet.

The deeply purple state will learn Saturday whether recounts will be held in the bitter, tight U.S. Senate race between Republican Gov. Rick Scott and incumbent Democrat Bill Nelson; and in the governor’s race between former Republican U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis and the Democratic mayor of Tallahassee, Andrew Gillum.

The state’s recount procedures have been revised since Florida held the country hostage for a month 18 years ago, when George W. Bush edged Al Gore for the presidency. Among other things, the infamous punch-card ballots are no longer.

Yet, Scott and President Donald Trump on Friday alleged fraud without evidence, even as the often-laborious process of reviewing ballots in a close race continued ahead of the Saturday noon deadline. Both Scott and Nelson sought to get the courts to intervene.

Scott said “unethical liberals” were trying to steal the election in Democratic strongholds of Broward and Palm Beach counties. He suggested something was awry because vote-counters were taking longer there than in other jurisdictions, and his thin lead has kept narrowing since election night. On Friday, he led by 0.21 percentage point, low enough to require a recount.

A recount is mandatory if the winning candidate’s margin is less than 0.5 percentage points when the first unofficial count is verified Saturday by Florida’s secretary of state. If the margin is less than 0.25 percent, the recount must be done by hand.

In Washington, Trump took Scott’s side, telling reporters that the federal government could get involved and adding: “All of the sudden, they are finding votes out of nowhere.”

“What’s going on in Florida is a disgrace,” he said.

Although the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said no allegations of fraud had been made, Scott asked — but did not order — the agency to investigate the counties’ elections departments.

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(2) comments

Jimzan

C'mon it is 2018 it should "not" be that hard to get to the truth in this matter. It seems our "political system" is testing the waters, to see what they can get away with. Seems people turn their heads, and just walk away, way to often on so many political issues....hence the saying " The people get the Government they deserve".

Jimzan

C'mon it is 2018 it should "not" be that hard to get to the truth in this matter. It seems our "political system" is testing the waters, to see what they can get away with. Seems people turn their heads, and just walk away, way to often on so many political issues....hence the saying " The people get the Government they deserve".

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