Navy Commander Guantanamo Death

In this June 3, 2014, image provided by the U.S. Navy, Navy Capt. John R. Nettleton, then-commanding officer of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, speaks during a Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony. Nettleton was arrested Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2018, on charges that he interfered with the investigation into the death of a civilian with whom he fought after an argument over whether the officer had had an affair with the man's wife.

WASHINGTON — A former commander of the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay was arrested Wednesday on charges that he interfered with the investigation into the death of a civilian with whom he fought after an argument over whether the officer had had an affair with the man’s wife.

Navy Capt. John R. Nettleton remains on active duty, but he was removed from command shortly after civilian Christopher Tur was found floating in January 2015 in the waters off the base on the southeastern coast of Cuba.

Nettleton was accused in a federal indictment of obstruction of justice and concealing material facts, including that he and Tur had brawled, in an alcohol-fueled encounter at a base nightclub, after Tur accused the commander of having the affair.

Nettleton denied to his superior officer and others that he had the affair, but investigators later determined that it had happened, according to an indictment issued in Jacksonville, Florida, where Nettleton has been on temporary duty.

Tur’s older brother, Michael, welcomed the indictment. Nettleton is “facing some serious felony charges,” he said. “It’s not a homicide charge, but he’s facing some serious jail time.”

Nettleton was commander of the base since June 2012, but not the detention center where suspected terrorists are held.

An autopsy found that Tur, 42, died from drowning but that he had broken ribs suffered before he went into the water and a cut to his head. The investigation also turned up blood from Tur inside the entryway of Nettleton’s residence on the base and from a paper towel in the backyard.

Tur came to Guantanamo in May 2011 with his wife, Lara, and two children and worked as the loss prevention safety manager at the Navy Exchange.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.