Biden Budget Message

In this Sept. 24, 2021 photo, President Joe Biden speaks about the COVID-19 response and vaccinations in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. President Joe Biden’s plan for a massive expansion of social programs is being framed by supporters as such a high-stakes endeavor that it’s “too big to fail.” It also may be too big to describe. A series of crises, from Afghanistan to COVID-19, along with the convoluted legislative process have hampered the White House’s ability to promote the $3.5 trillion package or even say definitively what’s in it. The price tag is sure to shrink and it's possible that components could change. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden’s plan for a massive expansion of social programs is being framed by supporters as such a high-stakes endeavor that it’s “too big to fail.” It also may be too big to describe.

That’s a particular challenge as the White House struggles to sell the public on a wide range of initiatives packaged under the imprecise slogan of “Build Back Better.”

A series of crises, from Afghanistan to COVID-19, along with the convoluted legislative process have hampered the White House’s ability to promote the $3.5 trillion package or even say definitively what’s in it. The price tag is sure to shrink and it’s possible that components could change.

The package, now the subject of furious negotiations on Capitol Hill, would fundamentally transform the government’s relationship with its citizens and dramatically expand the social safety net.

It sets out to broaden well-known programs — for example, adding dental vision and hearing aid benefits to Medicare and continuing the Obama-era health law’s temporary subsidies that helped people buy insurance during the pandemic.

But anxiety has risen among congressional Democrats during the negotiations, with some blame placed on Biden. He had planned to spend recent weeks driving support for the legislation but was sidetracked by the tumult in Afghanistan and the surge in Coronavirus cases.

Some Democrats worry the president’s pitch on the package doesn’t always click with people looking for a more concrete idea of what’s in it for them.

“This is a case where the parts are greater than the sum: It’s important for people to know what the parts are, they are very popular and would have a very positive impact on people’s life,” said David Axelrod, former senior adviser to President Barack Obama. “But it’s become a battle over price tag and that’s unappealing. That’s the battlefield where Republicans want Democrats to fight.”

Polling suggests that elements in the bill such as child care and infrastructure are popular with large parts of the public. But advocates worry the voters don’t know that those things are in the plan.

“ ‘Building Back Better’ doesn’t say to people what we are building back — at least when you talk about bridges, people have an idea,” said Robert Blendon, a longtime public opinion analyst at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “It’s the price you pay when you are not dealing with a single issue. ... ‘Building Back’ is the slogan, but there’s just no evidence that the public grasps what is in this bill.”

The need for a reset was so clear that the West Wing decided that White House press secretary Jen Psaki would begin her Monday briefing by delivering a detailed rundown of just what’s in the bill. That’s according to two of the more than a half-dozen White House aides and Democrats close to the West Wing who were interviewed for this story but spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss private conversations.

Psaki began the briefing by stating: “I wanted to take the opportunity just to remind everyone, specifically in the public, of what we’re talking about in these packages and why the president is fighting so hard to get his agenda forward.”

Then she went through elements of the package, including          plans to address climate change, lower education costs and promote access to child care.

“This agenda is not some fringe wish list: It is the president’s agenda, the Democratic agenda, and what we all promised voters when they delivered us the House, Senate, and White House,” Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal, the chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said in a statement.

(1) comment

Jimzan 2.0

You are watching the future of America's children being destroyed,,,and Scumbags like the AP,. and pathetic Joe Biden (IMHO) are leading the charge. But hey as long as your EBT charges up at the end of the month...who cares about future generations right...it's all about "you"...right. "Self Serve"...seems to be the mantra for most Democrats.

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