Nonprofits, businesses and state governments nationwide are putting up money and volunteer hours in a battle to keep national parks safe and clean for vis­itors as the partial U.S. gov­ern­ment shutdown lingers.

But such makeshift ar­range­ments haven’t pre­vent­ed some parks from clo­sing and others from being inundated with trash. Support groups say do­na­tions of money and time could run short if the bud­get impasse be­tween Pres­i­dent Donald Trump and congressional Dem­o­crats lasts much longer. Some are calling for parks to close for the duration of the standoff, which Trump said Friday could last “months or even years.”

“Our national parks de­serve better than an im­pro­vised patchwork of emer­gency care,” Diane Regas, CEO of the Trust for Public Lands, said in a let­ter to Trump that noted reports of theft, poaching and accumulating piles of garbage and human waste. “They need robust funding and full-time protection, or they should be closed.”

Ryan Zinke, who recently stepped down under fire as Interior Department secretary, had ordered many national parks to stay open, saying visitors should not be penalized for the political feud over a border wall with Mexico. Dur­ing an interview with The Associated Press, Zinke said visitors should take action to keep parks clean.

“Grab a trash bag and take some trash out with you,” he said. “In order to keep them open, everybody has to pitch in.”

The park service has reached deals with more than 60 partner groups, con­ces­sion­aires and states to handle trash removal, rest­room cleanup and other basic tasks at more than 40 parks — and, in a few cases, to keep park staffers on the job, spokesman Jer­emy Barnum said Friday.

The state of New York was footing the bill to operate the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Na­tion­al Monument, while a pri­vate company donated port­able toilets at several lo­ca­tions on the National Mall in Washington. The Na­tion­al Park Foundation took charge of repairing and operating the National Christ­mas Tree.

Another nonprofit do­na­ted more than $50,000 to keep 15 rangers tem­po­rar­ily on the job at Great Smoky Mountains Na­tion­al Park in Tennessee and North Carolina.

At Joshua Tree National Park, volunteers have hauled away garbage, cleaned restrooms and re­stocked them with toilet paper, said John Lauretig, ex­ec­u­tive director of Friends of Joshua Tree.

“We’ve been dubbed the ‘Toilet Paper Angels,’ ” he said.

Yosemite National Park reported Friday that a man died after falling into a river on Christmas Day, and a spokesman said a state­ment was not issued more promptly and the in­ves­tig­ation is taking longer than usual because of the shut­down.

People living near Yo­sem­ite have organized work crews, while bus­i­nesses in neighboring towns are offering in­cen­tives for visitors to remove their rubbish.

The Rush Creek Lodge in Groveland gave a com­plimentary coffee, cocktail or dessert to all bringing a full trash bag from the park. Spokeswoman Teri Marshall said the lodge was trying to devise a slogan for the promotion.

“’Turning garbage into goodies’ is where I think I might be hanging our hat,” Marshall said.

People visiting Yosemite on Saturday will be re­ceiv­ing garbage bags and tips on how best to use the park during the shutdown, cour­tesy of the Tuolumne Coun­ty Visitors’ Bureau. One recommendation: “Go be­fore you go,” a reference to the limited number of open bathrooms, executive director Lisa Mayo said.

Grand Canyon National Park is open with help from Arizona, which was paying about $64,000 a week to cover restroom cleaning, trash removal and snow plowing. Anyone with permits to hike in the backcountry or raft on the Colorado River could go, but the park wasn’t issuing new permits, spokeswoman Emily Davis said.

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